Community Protection Notice

A community protection notice can be issued by a police officer, police community support officer, council officer or registered social landlord. The community protection notice orders a person to do something (e.g. muzzle the dog/ clear up an accumulation of faeces in a garden), stop doing something (e.g. letting a dog into children’s play areas), or take steps to get specific results (e.g. attend dog training classes).

 

In order to issue a community protection notice a dogs behaviour must be:-

  • Persistent

  • Unreasonable, and

  • Negatively affecting the quality of life for people or animals.

 

Prior to issuing a community protection notice written warning must be given, and this must state, what behaviour led to this warning, a reasonable period in which the behaviour must stop and what happens if they are issued with the community protection notice (and the penalties).

 

If a community protection notice is not complied with an individual could be:-

- fined up to £2500.00, and/or

- forced to pay costs (e.g. the cost of repairing a fence)

 

In addition, the court has the power to order a dog be taken from its owner and destroyed. This will only be as a last resort.

For your initial consultation get in touch with us today:

  • Call: Elizabeth West on

       0113 224 7840

  • Email:

       elizabeth.west@cohencramer.co.uk

  • Request a call back with the form on this page

To see how we can help get in touch with us today:

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